Published: The Bone House is Worn by the Fight

So a while back those crazy kids at if:book Australia were running this remix project called Lost in Track Changes where five writers were asked to write something and then also remix or respond to the things the other five writers wrote.

They also ran a little side-project called Open Changes where Emily Craven from if:book wrote a thing and then anyone who wanted to could remix it and submit it in the comments on that story. The best four things would then be posted online to be used as prompts in the following week by anyone who wanted to join in, and then the best four of those things would be used as prompts in the following week, and so on for eight weeks.

Anyway, long story short: I wrote a thing for Open Changes in the last week of the project, and it got picked. Given that there was no week nine, it didn’t get posted and remixed, but it did get included in the final iteration of Open Changes, which was a big-arse poster that featured the things that all the successful writers wrote, all designed to look like a tree and shit.

No, really – check it out:

IMG_8590

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in crappin' on about the inconsequential, people who are nice enough to publish me, poems, Published work, the writing process

Millireview: Grant Morrison/Frank Quitely – Pax Americana

PaxAmericana

I’ll let Mr Morrison be after this, I promise, but I just wanted to get a few things off my chest. This comic is so heavy with  references to 1986’s seminal game-changing Watchmen that it’s hard to see anything else in it, including plot or character. Basically you’ve got the superhero characters that DC Comics wouldn’t let Alan Moore use in Watchmen mimicking the plot of Watchmen by effectively taking the place of the characters Alan Moore ended up using instead, as though Moore had actually been allowed to use those proscribed characters in the first place. Which is neat in an easter-eggy kind of way except that 1) the comic they’re referencing is 28 years old and 2) Watchmen has loomed so large in contemporary superhero comics for so long that pretty much anything interesting that could have been said about it has already been said.

Outside the Watchmen references there’s not much else going on of interest: a lot of heavy-handed symbolism (a bazillion references to infinity and the number eight that include the layout of the comic itself), characters who know they’re in a comic (something  Morrison drops into almost everything he writes, but which he doesn’t actually ever do anything with), a staccato arrangement of scenes that resemble a narrative, and parallel monologues that vaguely resemble dialogue, overlaid with a brusque cynicism and casual approach to violence that comes across as just plain mean or cruel, especially for a writer who has in the past made arguments for superheroes as moral compasses and comics as living worlds.

Quitely’s art is lovely, as always, straddling the line between realism and cartoonishness in an eye-catching manner. The opening scene’s depiction of gobbets of blood and teeth pouring out of a man’s face after being shot in the head seemed a disappointing waste of his talents, though, and the intensely large number of panels per page (often choked with speech bubbles) used throughout the comic left me squinting more than gazing in delight at his work.

Not Recommended.

 

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in comics, crappin' on about the inconsequential, Me and my opinions

Links for Sunday: The relevance of Indigeneity, Candyland, recursive games, book murder, & Nilsson

Being a list of things I found in the interwebs that I thought were pretty good and all…

Only When Relevant…
The always excellent Luke Pearson wants to know exactly when someone’s Indigeneity is relevant and when it isn’t – and who gets to decide, anyway? This is definitely worth reading through to the end, especially for the neat graph.

Existential Comics – Candyland
I’ve never played Candyland, but now that I’ve seen Camus and Satre play it, I kind of want to.

Entire Screen of One Game
“you can’t win the game. it exists only to destroy your mind.” And yet you must play it.

Murdering A Book
Warren Ellis trumps the book-as-sculpture metaphor with something much more apt: something along the lines nailing bits of wood to a giant mutant tapeworm that you pulled out of your arse. Except it’s funnier when he says it.

Nilsson sings Skidoo (video)
And then there was the time Harry Nilsson sang the entire closing credits of that one movie.

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in i would like to recommend these people's writing, new ways to procrastinate

Poemix: I Must Destroy the Space Whale

SpaceWhale01@0 SpaceWhale02@0
Pictures by the remarkable Neale Blanden, words by me. First published in Torpedo #6.

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in comics, From the vaults, i would like to recommend these people's writing, my talented friends, poems

Attoreview: Patricia Lockwood – Balloon Pop Outlaw Black

balloonpopoutlawblack

The cartoon reaches deep into a pocket, deep into a hole in the pocket, into “hammerspace”, and retrieves a huge pair of scissors. His mother, who lives there, hands him what he needs. Touches the tips of his fingers.

A few of the poems in this, Lockwood’s first collection, are highly prosaic, long-lined stanzas stretching out over many pages, puntuated by what seem to be subsidiary poems within the body of the larger poem. There are a number of shorter poems here too, but the longer pieces make the strongest impression with their deep Whitman / Ashberry-esque explorations of surreal premises that use intelligence and humour to co-opt and dissect the conceits of received wisdom, cartoons, storybooks and schoolbooks, pursuing the implication of things like what it is to be an ink drawing, or what it would mean to live inside a whale, to profound conclusions. These poems are weird, unsettling, confident and beguiling. There are no poems here that directly speak of lived experience, but in her deep consideration of bizarre scenarios Lockwood unearths resonant emotions that will stay with you long after you finish reading.

Highly Recommended.

Buy Balloon Pop Outlaw Black from Octopus Books.

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in i would like to recommend these people's writing, lines I wish I'd written, poetry, reviews

Whitmore Press Poetry Prize Announced.

I just got the latest Whitmore Press newsletter, announcing Jill Jones and Tracy Ryan as the joint winners of this year’s Manuscript Prize and I gotta say I’m a little bemused.

Let me say straight off the bat that I have a lot of respect for Jones and Ryan’s poetry, and that it’s certainly a coup for Whitmore Press to add two such prestigious names to their roster, and that it’ll be great to see new books by both of these authors.

But.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in i would like to recommend these people's writing, Me and my opinions, poetry

Femtoreview: Grant Morrison – Supergods: Our World in the Age of the Superhero

Supergods_415

When I read Kirby’s tales of shining contemporary gods walking the streets of Manhattan, I can even see beyond the Beats to Ginsberg’s solar sunflower muse, William Blake, whose titanic primal figures Orc and Urthona are given new dress as Kirby’s Mister Miracle and Mantis. The dark fires of Urizen burn again in the firepits of Darkseid’s death planet, Apololips. In Blake and Kirby both, we see the play of immense revolutionary forces that will not be chained or fettered, the Romantic revolution of the 1800s and the hip sixties.

This loose mashup of the history of American comics with Morrison’s potted autobiography just doesn’t add anything new.If you’re a fan of superhero comics or Morrison’s work you’ll have come across most of what he posits in interviews or other, better overviews and critiques of comic book history. Though his prose is poetic and evocative, Morrison skips over the interesting aspects of his own comics work and glides past the work of his contemporaries that would seem to contradict his (alleged) thesis that superheroes can teach us to be better people. He never makes a convincing case that we are living in “the age of the superhero” – aside from the rise of the superhero movie in Hollywood, superhero comics themselves are still a very niche aspect of popular culture. SuperGods just doesn’t hold together. You’d get much more out of reading one of Morrison’s actual comics (I’d recommend All-Star Superman, Flex Mentallo, Animal Man or The Invisibles).

Not Recommended.

Compare prices for Flex Mentallo: Man of Muscle Mystery, All-Star Superman, The Invisibles and Animal Man graphic novels.

Compare prices for Supergods: Our World in the Age of the Superhero here. 

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in writing
Like what you read?
Go off-blog with Adam's ebooks!


Heroes And Civilians, featuring Stories about superheroes, octuplets, giant monsters, rabbits, robots & astronauts, is FREE TO DOWNLOAD RIGHT NOW!


Whose Doctor? Reflections on a Time Lord, featuring 9 Doctor Who essays & poems, including Adam's "Donna Noble Has Been Saved" poem, is only $5!


Man Bites Dog, Adam's novel about posties, poets, dobermans & Angela Lansbury is only $2!


Not Quite the Man for the Job, Adam's award-winning poetry collection, is also only $2!

ta-wit ta-woo
Also I Write This Twitter Fiction Thing Called Aramis Fox
Quelle Grammage!
CW Stoneking & glamorous band. Theatre Royal, Castlemaine. Rockin the all-white all night. Heads 'n' stuff. Malmsbury Station, 540pm. Profile. En route to Footscray Station, 4.09pm.

Join 840 other followers

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 840 other followers

%d bloggers like this: